Wednesday, March 18, 2009

From Science Daily: Fibromyalgia Can No Longer Be Called The 'Invisible' Syndrome

Hello Everyone,

I found this article today while doing some research. It really boosted my spirits in regards to my passion for Fibromyalgia to be legitimized as REAL. I wanted to share it with you too. Click on the link to read the entire piece.

I've got you all on my mind and hang'in in there with you!

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Retrieved from: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103084040.htm on March 18th 2009

"ScienceDaily (Nov. 4, 2008) — Using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), researchers in France were able to detect functional abnormalities in certain regions in the brains of patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia, reinforcing the idea that symptoms of the disorder are related to a dysfunction in those parts of the brain where pain is processed."

In the past, some researchers have thought that the pain reported by fibromyalgia patients was the result of depression rather than symptoms of a disorder. "Interestingly, we found that these functional abnormalities were independent of anxiety and depression status," Guedj said.

According to Guedj, disability is frequently used in controlled clinical trials to evaluate response to treatment. Because molecular imaging techniques such as SPECT can help predict a patient's response to a specific treatment and evaluate brain-processing recovery during follow-up, it could prove useful when integrated into future pharmacological controlled trials.

"Fibromyalgia may be related to a global dysfunction of cerebral pain-processing," Guedj added. "This study demonstrates that these patients exhibit modifications of brain perfusion not found in healthy subjects and reinforces the idea that fibromyalgia is a 'real disease/disorder."
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2 comments:

Pacific Northwest said...

I am writing to you from the Pacific Northwest Foundation about a case study that may be of interest to your research into fibromyalgia. While this was not a study undertaken by the Foundation, it was a case with which we have had access to in virtually every detail. This includes the chart notes (with the patient's approval) as well as the observations and insights of the patient's health care provider.

The case involves an adult female who had been disabled for eight years with diagnosed fibromyalgia. Within four months of treatment, she was able to backpack, regularly work a full day and have little or no pain.

As with all our studies, it is our hope to stimulate additional efforts to determine if these results were an aberration or have wider implications. To this end, we wanted to make you aware of the cast study (which can be found online at http://pnf.org/html/fibromyalgia.html), in the hope that it might prove useful as a starting point for research within your organization.

Thanks and kind regards,

Frank Cook
Pacific Northwest Foundation

Sherri said...

Mr. Cook, I deeply appreciate you taking the time to write to me and post this information. Thank you so very much! I'll be looking into it as soon as possible.

Many blessings,
Sherri